One West University Boulevard, Brownsville, Texas 78520 | 956-882-8200

College of Science, Mathematics and Technology

Dr. Mikhail M. Bouniaev, Dean
Science, Engineering & Technology Building #2.342
882-6701
mikhail.bouniaev@utb.edu
 
      The College of Science, Mathematics, and Technology offers the Master of Science degree with concentrations in Biology, Computer Science, Mathematics and Physics and a Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (M.S.I.S.) degree with concentrations in Biology and Computer Science.
     
      At The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB), the principal role of the College of Science, Mathematics, and Technology is to provide students with the opportunity to develop scientific knowledge, job skills, and work ethics that will prepare them for entry into the real world. Our academic programs in the sciences, math, and technology provide both theory and practical training. Emphasis is placed on individual initiative, self-discipline, and the pursuit of excellence. Additionally, our academic programs stimulate analytical thinking and establish a foundation for further education and learning. In order to help students grow with a rapidly evolving world, our academic programs are consistently updated to reflect current technology and industry needs. Finally, the College of Science, Mathematics, and Technology prides itself on offering academic programs that accommodate our unique geographical location by meeting the needs and opportunities of both the southern Texas and northern Mexico regions.

Graduate Programs
Ph. D in Physics Cooperative Between UTSA and UTB
M.S. in Biology
M.S.I.S. in Biology
M.S. in Computer Science
M.S.I.S. in Computer Science
M.S. in Mathematics
M.S. in Physics

Biological Sciences
 
Dr. David Hicks, Chair
LHSB #2.816
882-5055
david.hicks@utb.edu
 
Graduate Faculty
Alejandro Fierro-Cabo, Assistant Professor
David Hicks, Associate Professor
Richard Kline, Assistant Professor
Kenneth Pruitt, Assistant Professor
Heather Alexander, Assistant Professor
 
Master of Science in Biology (M.S.) - Biology
36-Hour Thesis/Non Thesis Program
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission.  Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in Biology are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal score of 153 (500 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Quantitative score of 144 (500 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    Two letters of reference from faculty members or supervisors attesting to the applicant’s potential to successfully complete graduate work
o    A personal statement from the applicant explaining why he/she wishes to pursue graduate study in biology including professional and personal goals, this letter should include the area of interest, and a short list of preferred faculty research supervisors
o    Undergraduate studies in biology, including completion of a set of core biology and support courses essentially the same as those required by UTB for the Bachelor Science in Biology.
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
Master of Science without Thesis: The Master’s degree program for non-thesis students requires a total of 36 semester credit hours (SCH). Non-thesis graduate students may be required to take up to 30 SCH of undergraduate coursework in biology or support areas, not applied to the degree program, to make up deficiencies in undergraduate preparation.  Courses required of all non-thesis MS students include six credit hours of core courses. The remaining 30 hours will be considered electives and will be chosen by the Graduate Advisory Committee (GAC) with input from the student. A maximum of 8 SCH may include graduate courses offered by other departments within the college. A program of study must be submitted during the first semester of graduate study.  Non-thesis students may change to the thesis M.S. program track at any time during the program.  The following core courses are required:
 
Degree Requirements
BIOL 6101 Graduate Seminar I.                          1 SCH
BIOL 6102 Graduate Seminar II.                         1 SCH
BIOL 5455 Biostatistics.                                     4 SCH
 
Comprehensive Exam
Non-thesis students must pass a comprehensive written or oral examination during their final semester covering general and advanced biological concepts. The comprehensive exam will be administered by a departmental committee and the student shall choose between a written or oral examination. Details of the comprehensive exam can be obtained from the departmental graduate program coordinator. 
 
Master of Science with Thesis:
The thesis MS program track requires a total of 36 semester credit hours (SCH).  Students may be required to take up to 30 credits of undergraduate coursework in biology or support areas, not applied to the degree program, to make up deficiencies in undergraduate preparation. Twelve credit hours of core courses will be taken by all students in the program. The remaining 24 hours will be considered electives and will be chosen by the GAC with input from the student. A maximum of 8 SCH may include graduate courses offered by other departments within the college.  A program of study must be submitted during the first semester of graduate study.  Thesis students may not change to the non-thesis M.S. program track after completing the 12 semester credit hours without the consent of the department graduate program committee. The following courses are required by all thesis students:
 
BIOL 6101 Graduate Seminar I.                         1SCH
BIOL 6102 Graduate Seminar II.                        1 SCH
BIOL 5455 Biostatistics.                                    4 SCH
BIOL 7300 Thesis.                                           3 SCH
BIOL 7301 Thesis.                                            3 SCH
 
Thesis
A research project as described under BIOL 7300 and 7301. The thesis topic and accompanying thesis research prospective must be approved in writing by the Faculty Advisor and GAC, Department Chair, and the Dean of Graduate Studies prior to the onset of thesis research projects. All research involving vertebrate subjects must also be approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee prior to commencing experiments.  All research using human subjects must be approved by the Human Subjects Research Review Committee prior to collection of any data.

Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (M.S.I.S.) in Biology
36-Hour Thesis/Non-Thesis Program

The M.S.I.S. in Biology degree requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit. The Biology concentration must have at least 12 and no more than 18 semester hours in the subject area. In addition, 18-24 hours must be taken in two or more supporting fields outside the area of concentration.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in Biology are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal score of 153 (500 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Quantitative score of 144 (500 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    Two letters of reference from faculty members or supervisors attesting to the applicant’s potential to successfully complete graduate work
o    A personal statement from the applicant explaining why he/she wishes to pursue graduate study in biology including professional and personal goals, this letter should include the area of interest, and a short list of preferred faculty research supervisors
o    Undergraduate studies in biology including completion of a set of core biology and support course essentially the same as those required by UTB for the Bachelor Science in Biology.
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
M.S.I.S. Without Thesis Degree Requirements
Area of Concentration                      Credit Hours
Biology                                         12-18
The Biology Concentration includes the following required core courses: BIOL 6101, 6102, and BIOL 5455. 
Two or more supporting fields         18-24
Total graduate hours for degree       36
 
Each student in the M.S.I.S. degree program will be assigned by the department chairperson, a Faculty Advisor and two additional faculty committee members who teach in Interdisciplinary Studies. The choice of courses in the concentration area and the selection of supporting fields will be determined through consultation between the student, the Faculty Advisor and the committee members. A formal Program of Study as described elsewhere in this catalog will be prepared and submitted for approval during the first semester of graduate study.
 
Comprehensive Exam
Non-thesis students must pass a comprehensive written or oral exam during their final semester covering advanced interdisciplinary concepts as they relate to biology and supporting fields.  The comprehensive exam will be administered by a departmental committee and the student shall choose between a written or oral examination.  Details of the comprehensive exam can be obtained from the departmental graduate program coordinator.
 
M.S.I.S. Thesis Degree Requirements
Area of Concentration                      Credit Hours
Biology                                                12-18
The Biology Concentration includes the following required core courses: BIOL 6101, 6102, and BIOL 5455. 
Two or more supporting fields which must include ISCI 7300 
and ISCI 7301 for thesis students           18-24
Total graduate hours for degree             36
 
Thesis
A research project should be chosen as described under ISCI 7300 and 7301.  The thesis topic and accompanying thesis research prospective must be approved in writing by the faculty advisor and GAC, department chair and the Dean of Graduate Studies prior to the onset of thesis research projects.  All research involving vertebrate subjects must also be approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee prior to commencing experiments.  All research using human subjects must be approved by the Human Subjects Research Review Committee prior to collection of any data.  Thesis students must present a seminar of their thesis research and pass an oral defense of their completed thesis.
 
Supporting Fields
Arts, Business Administration*, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Education*, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Geology, English, Government, History, Interdisciplinary Science, Interpreting, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, and Spanish
* No more than 12 semester hours total may be taken from the professional schools.
 
Graduate Course Descriptions
Biology
BIOL     5127     Coastal Ecology Laboratory
This course is a series of laboratory and field investigations emphasizing identification, biology and ecology of local marine organisms. Lec 3, Cr 3  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 5327.
 
BIOL     5136     Current Issues in Biology
Discussion and analysis of active areas of research in biology at an advanced level.  Topics will vary by semester offered.  A maximum of 3 SCH will count towards degree.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing.
 
BIOL     5170     Topics in Biology
Specialized content and/or field experiences not available in other courses. A maximum of 6 SCH will count towards degree, subsequent enrollment will not count. Lec 0, Lab 3, Cr 1
 
BIOL     5300     Graduate Biology for Educators
This course covers integrated biological principals from molecules through the biosphere, with a focus on specific contributions that knowledge of those principles has made to the physical, intellectual, and esthetic welfare of humanity. The course will include lectures, readings of scholarly and popular literature, discussion, and a scholarly and popular literature, discussion and a scholarly paper based on individual investigation of literature. Does not count towards a graduate degree in Biology. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing, eight semester credit hours in undergraduate BIOL, enrollment for a graduate degree outside of BIOL. Lec 3, Cr 3

BIOL     5301     Evolution
This course involves the study of organic evolution with an emphasis on mechanics, especially genetics and modern theories. This course will provide a common foundation of understanding of the fundamental principles that underpin and explain all of biology for all students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. BIOL 3403 or equivalent, BIOL 3409 or equivalent. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
BIOL     5327     Coastal Ecology
This course examines the major near shore habitats and communities of the western Gulf of Mexico including: beaches, sand dunes, estuaries, salt marshes, mud flats, sea grass meadows, and rocky shores.  Emphasis is placed on directed, field-oriented, individual research projects. Lec 3, Cr 3  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and one course in general ecology (BIOL 3309) or zoology (BIOL 3314 or BIOL 4302) or consent of the instructor.
 
BIOL     5340     Statistical Ecology
The application, interpretation, and critique of statistical methods for analyzing arrays of species-by-samples data as arise in biological monitoring of environmental impacts and fundamental studies of community ecology.  Topics include standard diversity indices, hierarchical clustering, multidimensional scaling, principal components analyses, analysis of similarities and selected advanced topics.  This course will emphasize the use of statistical software packages and reporting of results.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and one course in general ecology (BIOL 3309 or equivalent) or consent of the instructor. 
 
BIOL     5342     Restoration Ecology
This course explores the relevance of ecological principles applicable to the recovery of degraded ecosystems.  With an emphasis on the reestablishment of ecosystem functioning to facilitate recovery, topics discussed relate to the implementation and monitoring of restoration projects across systems and disturbances.  Prerequisite:  Graduate Standing and an introductory course in ecology, or field experience in ecology and an introductory course in biology, or consent from instructor.
 
BIOL     5350     Bioenergetics
The use of quantitative analysis of energy resource partitioning to study the evolution of adaptation strategy at the biochemical, cellular, individual, population and ecosystem levels, including quantitative analysis of physiological processes and the life history adaptations in terms of energetic efficiency. Lec.3, Cr. 3 Prerequisite: Graduate standing and one course in general physiology (BIOL 3301 or equivalent) or consent of the instructor.
 
BIOL     5370     Topics in Biology
Specialized lecture content topics not available in other courses. May be repeated for credit as content changes.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Lec 3, Lab 0, Cr 3
 
BIOL     5402     Marine Zoology
A study of the common marine animals, especially invertebrates in coastal water. Cannot be taken for credit by students with credit for BIOL 4402. Graduate students must complete an independent project.   Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4
 
BIOL     5404     Ichthyology
Classification, evolution, ecology, and biology of fishes. The lab emphasizes field surveys, taxonomy, and the identification of marine fishes. Graduate students are required to complete an independent project. Credit will not be given for both BIOL 4404 and BIOL 5404. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4
 
BIOL     5422     Conservation Biology
Focus on the controlled use and systematic protection of natural resources such as forests, soils, and water systems. Conservation integrates concepts of geography, climatology, geology, geomorphology, chemistry, and biology into one applied science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4
 
BIOL     5430     Animal Behavior
This course examines the biological basis of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include instincts and learning, behavioral genetics, development of behavior, neural and endocrine mechanisms, adaptive significance of behavior, and social behavior. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, four semester hours of upper-division biology. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4
 
BIOL     5455     Biostatistics
This course introduces methods for the collection and statistical analysis of biological data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation, regression and non-parametric methods. Students will practice data analysis using statistical software and sample data from various fields such as ecology, systematics, and biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, completion of four upper-level semester hours in biology and completion of college algebra (MATH 1314) or any mathematics course for which college algebra is a prerequisite. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4
 
BIOL     6101    Graduate Seminar I
In this course students will review the literature for current research topics, reporting and discussion with faculty and other students.  Students will refine a topic for scientific investigation, formulate testable hypotheses, design controlled experiments, conduct scientific literature searches, and interpret the methods and results of primary literature articles, as well as, refine their oral presentation skills.  Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.
 
BIOL         6102             Graduate Seminar II
In this course, students will learn professional skills for a career in the Biological Sciences such as grant agency selection, grant writing, preparation of a curriculum vitae, the peer review process, development and formatting of manuscripts, scientific proposals, review papers, cover letters and preparation of.  Students will learn to make proper use of bibliographic citations, write technical papers and prepare documents.  Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Lec 1, Cr 1.
 
BIOL     6185-6685         Graduate Research
Faculty supervised research designed for students who are working on a research or thesis project.  A maximum of 6 SCH of Graduate Research will count toward the degree; subsequent enrollments will not count. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
 
BIOL     6301     Molecular Techniques and Laboratory Instrumentation
This course studies the theory and application of laboratory techniques, with an emphasis on molecular techniques. The course may be team taught by various members of the Graduate Faculty as expertise dictates. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Lec 2, Lab 3, Cr 3
 
BIOL     6303     Evolutionary Ecology
The role of genetics and evolution at the individual, population, and community levels. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 3
 
BIOL     6312     Advanced Cellular and Molecular Biology
An in-depth study of the physical and molecular activity at the cellular level. Topics to be emphasized include: nucleic acid structure and organization, gene expression and its regulation, protein structure and recombinant DNA techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, BIOL 3412 or equivalent, CHEM 3303 or equivalent. Lec 3, Cr 3

BIOL     6330     Molecular and Cellular Evolution
This course involves the study of the appearance of life on earth and its subsequent evolution at the molecular and cellular levels. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
BIOL     6365     Graduate Biological Research Problems
Supervised research involving identification and definition of a problem, preparation of a proposal, collection and analysis of data, writing and submission of a report in standard scientific form for faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and advisor. Lec 0, Lab 8, Cr 3.
 
BIOL     6390   Biology Internship
Paid or volunteer work in an industrial, educational, private agency, or government facility, under the general supervision of collaborating personnel.  The student must secure the appointment for such work, but faculty will assist in finding opportunities.  The collaborating personnel and the student must agree to written terms required by the Biological Sciences Department.  Successful completion requires a letter from the collaborating personnel detailing the student’s qualifying experience, an acceptable scholarly report, and a seminar presentation.  The instructor must be a full-time member of the Graduate Faculty.
 
BIOL     6400   Neuroscience
This course studies the integrative functions of the animal nervous system from molecules to behavior. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4
 
BIOL     6404   Fish Ecology
Interactions of fishes especially teleosts, with their physical and biotic environment. The lab emphasizes fieldwork and includes an individual student project. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4
 
BIOL     7300     Thesis
Supervised research will include design of an original research problem with a written proposal, collection and analysis of original data, and writing of a scientific report in acceptable publication format. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Cr 3
 
BIOL     7301   Thesis
Continuation of BIOL 7300 Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission, Cr 3
 
School of Engineering and Computational Science
Dr. Juan Raymundo Iglesias
SETB 1.550A
882-6616
juan.iglesias@utb.edu
 
Graduate Faculty
Juan R. Iglesias, Associate Professor
Fitratullah Khan, Professor
Hansheng Lei, Associate Professor
Mahmoud K. Quweider, Professor
Liyu Zhang, Assistant Professor

Master of Science in Computer Science
36-Hour Program
The Master of Science in Computer Science requires a total of 36 semester credit hours (SCH) in graduate coursework.  MSCS has two tracks:  1) MSCS – Computer Science, and 2)  MSCS – Computational Science.  The admission requirements are the same for both.  There are some differences in course requirements, which are listed below.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for master’s degree seeking students in Computer Science are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0
o    GRE Verbal score of 140 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Quantitative score of 153 (500 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Analytical Writing score of 3.5
o    A personal statement from the applicant explaining why he/she wishes to pursue graduate study in computer science or computational science
 
Students are required to have a basic background in computer science. If applicant’s undergraduate major is not Computer Science, a diagnostic test will be given, and a student will be required to take the corresponding undergraduate courses on subject areas where he/she failed.
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.  Students may be required to complete additional leveling courses to settle academic deficiencies. 
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies. Visit our website at www.utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
International Students
International students wishing to pursue online degrees are not eligible for an F1 or F3 student visa.
 
Required Courses:  MSCS – Computer Science
The track for Computer Science is for students who have a bachelor degree in computer science or closely related field and are willing to advance their knowledge to an advanced level.
 
Core Courses                                                                                      9
Complete all the three courses in one of the following categories:
Theory of computation
COSC    5361     Computability Theory                                                     3
COSC    5362     Complexity Theory                                                         3
COSC    5345     Advanced Algorithm Analysis                                          3
OR
Systems Development
COSC    5315     Advanced Computer Networks                                        3
COSC    5346     Advanced Software Engineering                                      3
COSC    5349     Computer Architecture                                                   3
OR
Scientific Computing
COSC    5360     Numerical Methods                                                        3
COSC    5343     Data Mining                                                                   3
COSC    5381     Bioinformatics                                                                3
 
Computer Science Elective Courses*                                                 21
 
Graduation Options
(Students must choose one of the following graduation options)
Thesis
COSC    6300     Thesis I                                                                        3
COSC    6301     Thesis II                                                                       3
OR
Project
COSC    6303     Graduate Project                                                            3
Computer Science Elective Course*                                                          3
OR
Comprehensive Examination
Computer Science Elective Courses*                                                        6
 
Total Graduate Hours for degree                                                             36
*Any COSC graduate level courses may be used as Computer Science Elective Courses with previous written consent of the CIS Graduate Advisor
 
Required Courses:  MSCS – Computational Science
The track of Computational Science is for students who are interested in constructing computational models and quantitative analysis techniques and using computers to analyze and solve scientific problems.

Computer Science Advanced Courses                                                 9
Take three courses out of the following:
COSC    5335     Computer Vision
COSC    5343     Data Mining
COSC    5345     Advanced Algorithm Analysis
COSC    5350     Artificial Intelligence
COSC    5360     Numerical Methods
COSC    5381     Bioinformatics
 
Computer Science Elective Courses*                                                  12
Supporting Discipline Elective Courses**                                            9
 
Graduation Options
(Students must choose one of the following graduation options)
Thesis
COSC    6300     Thesis I                                                                         3
COSC    6301     Thesis II                                                                        3
OR
Project
COSC    6303     Graduate Project                                                            3
Computer Science Elective Courses* or Supporting Discipline Elective
Courses**                                                                                             3
OR
Comprehensive Examination
Computer Science Elective Courses* or Supporting Discipline Elective
Courses**                                                                                             6
*Any COSC graduate level courses may be used as Computer Science Elective Courses with previous written consent of the CIS Graduate Advisor.
**Any graduate level courses in a given discipline with previous written consent of the CIS Graduate Advisor.  Disciplines include Mathematics, Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, and any other graduate level discipline with previous written consent of the CIS Graduate Advisor.
Curriculum
Computer Science Advanced Courses:
COSC    5315     Advanced Computer Networks
COSC    5319     Computer and Cyber Security
COSC    5335    Computer Vision
COSC    5343    Data Mining
COSC    5345     Advanced Algorithm Analysis
COSC    5347    Advanced Software Engineering
COSC    5350    Artificial Intelligence
COSC    5361      Computability Theory
COSC    5362      Complexity Theory
Computer Science Electives:
COSC    5300    Compiler Construction
COSC    5317     Signals and Systems
COSC    5318     Digital Forensics
COSC    5321     E-Commerce
COSC    5330    Computer Graphics
COSC    5332    Human Computer Interaction
COSC    5333    Digital Image Processing
COSC    5349    Computer Architecture
COSC    5355    Expert Systems
COSC    5360    Numerical Methods
COSC    5381    Bioinformatics
 
Capstone
Computer Science offers three different graduation options:  thesis, project, and comprehensive examination.  In order to complete a thesis, a student selecting the thesis graduation option will enroll in COSC 6300 Thesis I and COSC 6301 Thesis II.  The student will select a thesis committee consisting of at least three graduate faculty members, one of them will be appointed as the chairperson.  Enrollment to COSC 6301 Thesis II requires the student to pass an oral defense of the thesis proposal which will be examined by the thesis committee.  The student must pass an oral defense of the completed thesis which will be examined by the thesis committee.
 
In order to complete a project, a student selecting the project graduation option will enroll in COSC 6303 Graduate Project.  It is expected that the student will write a project paper to report the project outcomes.  The student will select a project committee consisting of at least three graduate faculty members, one of them will be appointed as the chairperson.  The student must pass an oral defense of the completed project which will be examined by the project committee.
 
Students may graduate by approving a comprehensive examination.  The exam will not be scheduled prior to the student’s last semester of coursework.  Contents of the exam will be contingent on the student’s prescribed graduate coursework and it will be administered by the department’s Graduate Committee.
 
Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (M.S.I.S.) in Computer Sciences
36-Hour Thesis/Non-thesis
The Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (MSIS) with concentration in Computer Science (CS) requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit. A total of 18 graduate semester credit hours must be taken in CS.  Additional 18 hours, including ISCI 7300 and ISCI 7301, must be taken in two or more supporting fields outside CS.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission.  Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in Computer Science are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal Score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    Quantitative Score of 144 (500 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    Personal statement from the applicant explaining why he/she wishes to pursue graduate study in CS including professional and personal goals. This letter should include the area of interest, and a short list of preferred faculty research supervisors.
o    Each entering graduate student will take a diagnostic evaluation conducted by the Computer Science Graduate Coordinator.  The evaluation will serve to identify areas that must be strengthened by the student with remedial courses and to identify the possible tracks of specialization that may be of interest to the student.
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the Office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies.  Visit utb.edu/graduatestudies.

International Students
International students wishing to pursue online degrees are not eligible for an F1 or F3 student visa.
 
Degree Requirements: 36 hours
Area of Concentration................................... Credit Hours
Computer Science .......................................................18
Two or more supporting fields.......................... ............18
(must include ISCI 7300 and ISCI 7301)
Total Graduate Hours for degree... ...............................36
 
Thesis
As part of their graduate curriculum, students must take ISCI 7300 and ISCI 7301 leading to the completion of their thesis. At the appropriate time in their graduate study, students will select a thesis committee in order to approve a topic and to assist in the preparation of the thesis. The thesis committee will be composed of at least three graduate faculty, one of them will be appointed as the chairperson. Co-chairs are possible in case of co-supervision of an interdisciplinary project. Students must pass an oral defense of the completed thesis. The thesis needs not consist solely of a written research paper; software, analytical, practical performance, or other appropriate projects may also be considered. It is expected that the student will choose a topic that appropriately integrates aspects of the discipline of Computer Science and the supporting fields.
 
Supporting Fields
Arts, Business Administration*, Biology, Criminal Justice, Education*, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Geology, English, Government, History, Interdisciplinary Science, Interpreting, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, and Spanish. A total of 18 graduate semester credit hours including ISCI 7300 and ISCI 7301 must be taken from two or more supporting fields outside Computer Science. Selection of supporting fields must be determined through consultation with the Faculty Advisor. The use of mathematics as supporting area is strongly encouraged but not required; however, because of the broad application nature of Computer Science, any approved M.S.I.S. field can be a supporting field for the M.S.I.S. with concentration in Computer Science. 
*No more than 12 semester hours total may be taken from the professional schools.

Curriculum of Study
Graduate Computer Science Courses
Students are required to take 18 hours of graduate course in COSC (above 5000) that may be chosen from the following:
COSC 5300 Compiler Construction
COSC 5310 Operating Systems
COSC 5313 Computer Networks
COSC 5315 Advanced Computer Networks
COSC 5317 Signals and Systems
COSC 5318 Digital Forensics
COSC 5319 Computer and Cyber Security
COSC 5321 E-Commerce
COSC 5330 Computer Graphics
COSC 5332 Human Computer Interfaces
COSC 5333 Digital Image Processing
COSC 5335 Computer Vision
COSC 5342 Database Management Systems
COSC 5343 Data Mining
COSC 5345 Advanced Algorithm Analysis
COSC 5346 Software Engineering
COSC 5347 Advanced Software Engineering
COSC 5349 Computer Architecture
COSC 5350 Artificial Intelligence
COSC 5355 Expert Systems
COSC 5360 Numerical Methods
COSC 5361 Computability Theory
COSC 5362 Complexity Theory
COSC 5381 Bioinformatics
 
Graduate Course Descriptions
Computer Science
COSC    5300     Compiler Construction
Different phases of compiler construction are studied: lexical, syntax, semantics and code generation.  Projects leading to the complete construction of a compiler for a mini-set of a language are carried out. Prerequisite: COSC 3355, COSC 3345 and COSC 2325 or consent of instructor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5301   Foundations of Programming
This is an introductory course in computer programming.  Topics include basic concepts in object oriented and structured programming, testing and debugging, abstract data types, basic searching and sorting techniques, and recursion.  This course cannot be applied toward any graduate degree in Computer Science.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC   5302 Foundations of Algorithm Analysis and Design
This course introduces advanced concepts in Computer Science.  Topics include fundamental algorithms such as quick sort, hash tables, binary search trees, graph algorithms and complexity analysis.  This course cannot be applied toward any graduate degree in Computer Science.  Prerequisite:  COSC 5301 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5310     Operating Systems
The student is familiarized with the services common to most operating systems. Issues in CPU scheduling, concurrent processes, deadlocks, memory management, file management, and distributed systems are dealt with. Students are given relevant projects to support the theoretical aspects learned in class. Prerequisites: Admission to MSIS or MS Program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5313     Computer Networks
Computer networks are presented via seven distinct layers: physical, data link, network, transport, session, presentation, and application layer.  Hardware and protocols used at different layers and in different networks are studied in detail.  Different existing networks are studied as examples in every layer. Prerequisite: COSC 3330 or departmental consent. Lec 3 Cr 3
 
COSC    5315     Advanced Computer Networks
The design of networks and their performance will be covered in this course. Modern Networks such as ATM and Gigabit Ethernet network will also be studied. Other topics that will be studied are cryptology, network programming, and secure channels. Prerequisite: COSC 3330, COSCU 2317. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC   5317   Signals and Systems
This course covers the representation and analysis techniques for discrete and continuous signals in one or more dimensions.  Topics include random variables, information theory, sampling and quantization, and signal representation in the time and frequency domains with applications to multimedia and telecommunications.  Prerequisite:  MATH 2414, MATH 3381, and COSC 2336.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC   5318   Digital Forensics
An introduction to the science, technology, procedures, and laws of acquiring and analyzing evidence from digital media and computing devices.  Current forensics tools will be surveyed, and case studies will be assigned and presented in class.   Prerequisite: COSC 4313 or COSC 5313.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC   5319   Computer and Cyber Security
This course is an in-depth study of computer systems and network security principles.  Key areas include network attacks and defenses, operating system flaws, malware, social networks attacks, and digital rights management.  Prerequisite:  COSC 4313 or COSC 5313.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5321     E-Commerce
This course introduces the technologies used in building e-commerce applications including e-commerce scalable architecture design, Internet infrastructure, administration, electronic payment systems, e-business relationships, mobile commerce (mCommerce), and business-to-business (B2B) marketplace design, strategies and models. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5330     Computer Graphics
The student is familiarized with structured graphical objects.  The algorithms for transforming, clipping, and projecting objects are put into practice through several projects.  Hidden line/surface removal, shading/lighting models, and the problem of aliasing are studied. Prerequisite: COSC 3345 or consent of instructor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5332     Human Computer Interfaces
Simple and compound classes, page and page selector classes, animation and pop up classes, configuration and deriving of new objects, application interface, overall design, and machine dependencies are studied.  Application-oriented graphical user interfaces are built. Prerequisite: COSC 2336 or consent of the instructor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5333     Digital Imaging Processing
This course covers the basic techniques used in acquiring, processing, and displaying of digital images and video.  Topics include image acquisition, spatial and frequency domain representation, image filtering, image compression, image analysis, morphological image processing and image understanding.  Efficient implementation of image processing algorithms in a structured computer language is emphasized. Prerequisite:  MATH 2314 and COSC 2336 or departmental consent.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5335     Computer Vision
This course covers the fundamental and advanced ideas of developing computerized procedures to extract numeric and symbolic information from images. Key ideas include image formation, acquisition, calibration, object recognition, video understanding, stereo imaging, optical flow and classification methods. System implementation and applications in communications, medicine, robotics and manufacturing are introduced. Prerequisite: COSC 4333; MATH 2313. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5342     Database Management Systems
Data abstraction and models, entity-relationship model, relational model, formal and commercial query languages, network and hierarchical data models, relational database design, file and system structure; indexing and hashing, query processing, and concurrency control are studied. Prerequisite: At least a C in both COSC 3345 and COSC 3330.  Lec. 3 Cr. 3
 
COSC    5343     Data mining
This course gives the fundamentals of applying artificial intelligence techniques for analysis, learning and prediction of information using data extracted form databases. Topics include data mining system architecture, data preprocessing, pattern recognition, attribute relevance analysis, class discrimination, rule association, correlation analysis, classification, prediction, cluster analysis and query languages. Prerequisite: At least a C in the following courses COSC 3330, MATH 2342 and MATH 3373. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5345     Advanced Algorithm Analysis
Both basic and advanced techniques of algorithm design and analysis are introduced. Algorithms with real applications are thoroughly studied. The notion if NP-complete problems and design and analysis techniques for approximation and randomized algorithms are also introduced. Prerequisite: at least a C in COSC 3345, or consent of instructor.

COSC    5346   Software Engineering
The scope of systems analysis, systems investigation and analysis, input and output design, storage devices, file organization, sorting and merging, factors affecting file design, system design, the program specifications, design strategy, and financial applications are studied. Prerequisites: Admission to MSIS or MS Program.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC 5347 Advanced Software Engineering
This course is an in-depth study of advance software engineering principles. Key areas include project management, team building, team organization , cost estimation, scheduling, description and evaluation of software architecture design, object-oriented design methodologies, and refactoring. Practical aspects of software are also discussed including testing, maintenance, safety, security, quality assurance, and reliability. Prerequisites: COSC 4346, or consent of instructor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    5349     Computer Architecture
Classical and modern computer architectures will be studied in this course. Techniques such as microprogramming and counter-decoder methods will be included. Other topics that will be studied include parallel computing architectures, their performance and programming. Prerequisite: COSC 3325. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC     5350    Artificial Intelligence
This course discusses the theoretical and practical foundations of artificial intelligence.  Principles in reasoning, perception, deduction, planning, learning, knowledge representation and problem resolution are some of the areas covered. Prerequisite: At least a C in COSC 3345.  Lec 3, Cr 3

COSC     5355     Expert Systems
This course covers the theoretical and practical principles of modern expert systems construction.  Topics include logic and reasoning, knowledge representation, rule-based reasoning, inexact reasoning, ontologies, and knowledge acquisition.  Prerequisite: At least a C in COSC 5350 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC 5360 Numerical Methods
The topics include root finding, interpolation and numerical differentiation, polynomial interpolation, estimating derivate, numerical integration, systems of linear equations, approximation by spline functions, and smoothing of data.  Prerequisite: COSC 2336 and MATH 2414 or consent of the instructor.
 
COSC 5361 Computability Theory
This course introduces elements in mathematical foundations of computer science, formal language theory and computability theory. Mathematical foundations of computer science include topics such as set theory, relations and functions, and proof methods. Prerequisites: at least a C in COSC 5345, or consent of instructor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC 5362 Complexity Theory
This course introduces basic concepts, results and techniques in computational complexity theory, and provides a deeper insight of the power of computing using the Turing-machine model. Prerequisites: at least a C in COSC 5361. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC   5381   Bioinformatics
This course provides an introduction to the rapidly evolving field of bioinformatics with the overarching goal of understanding how computer science plays an integral part both in the application and algorithmic aspects of the field.  Topics include molecular biology databases, sequence alignment, genomics, proteomics, phylogenetic analysis, clustering, and gene expression analysis.  Prerequisite: COSC 2336.  Lec 3, Cr 3

COSC    6300     Thesis I
This course constitutes the first part of a student’s course work requirement in completing his master thesis; students must take COSC 6300 and COSC 6301 leading to the completion of their thesis. Students must successfully pass an oral defense of the thesis proposal or the software project plan. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
COSC    6301     Thesis II
This course constitutes the second part of a student’s course work requirement in completing his master thesis; students must take COSC 6300 and COSC 6301 leading to the completion of their thesis. Students must successfully pass an oral defense of the thesis proposal or the software project plan. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor. Lec 3, Cr 3

COSC    6303     Graudate Project
Students will complete a graduate project, write a paper reporting the project outcomes, and orally defend the project examined by a committee.  The committee will consist of three faculty members selected by the student, one of them appointed as the committee schair.  Students cannot take this course before their last semester of coursework.
 
Mathematics
Dr. Jerzy Mogilski, Chair
SETB #2.454
882-6628
jerzy.mogilski@utb.edu
 
Graduate faculty
Mikhail Bouniaev, Professor
Roger Contreras, Associate Professor
Alexey Glazyrin, Assistant Professor
Ranis Ibragimov, Associate Professor
Jerzy K. Mogilski, Associate Professor
Oleg Musin, Professor
Vesselin Vatchev, Associate Professor
Taeil Yi, Associate Professor
Paul-Hermann Zieschang, Professor
 
Master of Science in Mathematics (M.S.)
The Master of Science in Mathematics has three tracks, Pure Mathematics, Industrial Mathematics and Teaching Mathematics. In each case, the student has thesis (except Teaching Mathematics track), non-thesis and project option.
 
Mathematicians with a strong background in pure mathematics are surprisingly attractive to many professional branches in our society, particularly intelligence technology, finance, security, engineering and physics. Industrial mathematics is a growing branch in mathematics which provides trained personnel for key positions in modern industries. Teaching Mathematics track offers an opportunity to become an effective mathematics instructor with educational technology skills especially for on-line/distance education.
 
Admission Requirements
Evidence of academic achievement and potential for advanced study and research is required for graduate admission. Specific criteria for Unconditional Admission for Master’s degree seeking students in Mathematics are:
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE Verbal score of 146 (400 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    GRE Quantitative score of 148 (600 if taken prior to August 2011)
o    Two letters of recommendation from college or university professors indicating the applicant’s potential in Mathematics
o    A letter from the applicant indicating reasons for wanting to pursue graduate studies in Mathematics including professional and personal goals; in this letter, the applicant should indicate his/her field of interest in Mathematics as well as his/her preference for an advisor
o    Undergraduate transcript including completion of a set of Mathematics courses determined by the departmental graduate committee.  (An applicant lacking some of these courses may be accepted to the program but will be required to complete them during the first academic year in order to continue in the program. An undergraduate course may be taken concurrently with graduate course work.)
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
 
Notification of decisions on graduate admission is made by the office of Graduate Studies based on the admission criteria and recommendation of the academic department. Information related to application procedures and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies. Visit our website at www.utb.edu/graduatestudies.
 
Admissions for Five Year M.S. in Mathematics Track
The Department of Mathematics enables highly motivated students with strong intellectual capacities to earn a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a Master of Science in Mathematics within a five-year period.  The integrated program is designed to prepare students for competitive doctoral programs and provide strong leadership skills and professional depth to students entering teaching positions.
o  Minimum semester credit hours (SCH) required for graduation:  156 (SCH) (120+36) - 12 common SCH = 144 SCH
o  Students are eligible to apply for admission to the 5 year program during the semester they complete 63 SCH (including  15 math) of undergraduate coursework with at least 3.2 GPA and minimum 3.5 GPA from at least 15 SCH in mathematics courses.
o  By the end of their third year, students in the program must complete minimum 93 SCH maintaining at least 3.2 GPA and 3.5 GPA in mathematics courses.
o  To be considered for admission to the 5 year program, students must submit a 5 year application during the semester they complete 93 SCH.  Only 5 year program candidates demonstrating superior undergraduate academic performance in mathematics and strong recommendation will be considered for admission.
o  If admitted to the program, the student must complete at least 9 SCH of MS courses during the fourth year of undergraduate study.  Candidates should work with their undergraduate advisor to determine how the courses will apply to the undergraduate degree.  Before the start of the second semester of the fourth year, they should submit the GRE with a minimum score of 1000.
o  At the end of the fourth year, assuming that all other graduation requirements are met, the student earns his or her baccalaureate degree.
o  During their fifth year, the student completes the remaining semester hours toward the MS in Mathematics degree.
 
Degree Requirements
The M.S. program requires 36 semester credit hours. Graduate students may be required to take undergraduate courses in Mathematics to make up for deficiencies in preparation as determined by their temporary Admission and/or Advising Committee. These courses will not be applied to the degree program.
 
M.S. in Pure Mathematics
Courses required: 36 SCH
Required Mathematics Core Courses: 9 SCH
MATH 5321       Abstract Algebra                                     3 SCH
MATH 5331 Contemporary Geometry                               3 SCH
MATH 5341 Measure and Integration                               3 SCH
 
Restricted Electives 9 SCH Total
Take one course from each of the following three groups:
MATH 5323          Group Theory                                      3 SCH
or
MATH 5329         Number Theory                                    3 SCH
 
MATH 5339         Topology                                             3 SCH
or
MATH 5362         Graph Theory                                      3 SCH
 
MATH 5342 Functions of one Complex Variable                 3 SCH
or
MATH 5346      Functional Analysis                                  3 SCH
                                                                                   
Elective Courses (12 SCH Total)
Take any three courses listed in the Graduate Mathematics Courses Inventory with the exception of MATH 5395 Research Seminar* and MATH 5397 Thesis.
 
Special Requirements (6 SCH Total)
One of the following three options:
 
With Comprehensive Examination
MATH 5395 Research Seminar (twice)
(The two seminars must be in two different areas in Mathematics)
 
With Project
MATH 5395 Research Seminar (twice)
(The two seminars must be in two different areas in Mathematics)
Project (The student must give a presentation at a conference/seminar and/or symposium or publish an article).
 
With Thesis
MATH 5397 Thesis (twice)
(The two thesis courses may not be taken during the same semester).
Qualification for thesis option depends on the student performance on courses in the Required Mathematics Core Courses and Restricted Elective groups.
*Note: MATH 5395 Research Seminar is allowed once as an elective course if Thesis Option is chosen.
 
M.S. in Industrial Mathematics
Courses required: 36 SCH
Required Mathematics Core Courses (9 SCH Total)
MATH 5321       Abstract Algebra                                                3 SCH
MATH 5331 Contemporary Geometry                                           3 SCH
MATH 5341Measure and Integration                                            3 SCH
Restricted Electives (12 SCH Total)
Take four out of the following six courses:
MATH   5348        Differential Equations                                       3 SCH
MATH   5361        Mathematical Modeling                                    3 SCH
MATH   5365        Discrete Mathematics                                      3 SCH
MATH   5367        Numerical Analysis                                          3 SCH
MATH   5379        Stochastic Analysis                                          3 SCH
MATH   5381        Mathematical Statistics                                     3 SCH

Elective Courses (9 SCH Total)
Take any three courses listed in the Graduate Mathematics Courses Inventory with the exception of MATH 5395 Research Seminar* and MATH 5397 Thesis and the courses designed for mathematics teaching option: MATH 5305 History of Mathematics, MATH 5307 Practicum in Collegiate Mathematics Teaching and MATH 5392 Special Topics in Mathematics for Teachers. With advisor’s approval student may replace up to two mathematics elective courses with graduate courses from another discipline.
 
Special Requirements (6 SCH Total)
One of the following three options:
 
With Comprehensive Examination
MATH 5395       Research Seminar (twice)
(The two seminars must be in two different areas in Mathematics)
Comprehensive Examination
 
With Project
MATH 5395       Research Seminar (twice)
(The two seminars must be in two different areas in Mathematics)
Project (The student must give a presentation at a conference/seminar and/or symposium, or publish an article).
 
With Thesis
MATH 5397       Thesis (twice)
(The two thesis courses may not be taken during the same semester).
Qualification for thesis option depends on the student performance on courses in the Required Mathematics Core Courses and Restricted Elective groups.
*Note: MATH 5395 Research Seminar is allowed once as an elective course if Thesis Option is chosen.
 
M.S. in Teaching Mathematics with Project: 36 SCH
Required Mathematics Core Courses (9 SCH Total)
MATH   5321     Abstract Algebra
MATH   5331     Contemporary Geometry 
MATH   5341     Measure and Integration
 
Restricted Electives (12 SCH Total)
Take four out of the following 12 Education/Mathematics Education/Technology courses:
EDCI 6302     Practitioner Research                     3 SCH
EDCI 6341     Teaching Algebraic concepts           3 SCH
EDCI 6343     Teaching Geometric Concepts         3 SCH
EDCI 6349     Current Issues and Research         
                        in Mathematics Education            3 SCH
EDTC 6332        Practicum                                   3 SCH
EDTC 6357     Using Open Source Courseware
                        for Online Course Development     3 SCH
MATH 5305 History of Mathematics                     3 SCH
MATH 5307 Collegiate Mathematics Teaching       3 SCH
MATH 5309 Integrating Technology
                      into mathematics                          3 SCH
MATH 5392 Special Topics in Mathematics
                      for Teachers                                3 SCH
 
Elective Mathematics Course (12 SCH Total)
Four courses selected from the following graduate level Mathematics courses:
MATH 5304    Foundations of Mathematics                       3 SCH
MATH 5329    Number Theory                                         3 SCH
MATH 5339    Topology                                                  3 SCH
MATH 5361    Mathematical Modeling                               3 SCH
MATH 5362    Graph Theory                                           3 SCH
MATH 5365    Discrete Mathematics                                3 SCH
MATH 5367    Numerical Analysis                                    3 SCH
MATH 5368 Codes, Cyphers and Security in
                      Communications                                       3  SCH
MATH 5381 Mathematical Statistics                                  3 SCH
MATH 5391 Special Topics in Mathematics                        3 SCH
 
Required Research Course (3 SCH Total)
MATH 5395 Research Seminar                                        3 SCH
 
Special Requirement
The student must give a presentation at a conference/seminar/symposium and/or publish an article on a journal/proceeding.
 
M.S. in Teaching Mathematics without Project: 36 SCH
The same degree plan (above) without Required Research Course is implemented except you must take 5 electives mathematics courses and must take a Comprehensive examination.
 
Transfer Students
Graduate students transferring from another university may be admitted to the program.  A maximum of nine graduate credit hours from an accredited university with grades of B or better may be applied to the total semester credit hours required for the degree, if approved by the departmental graduate committee.
 
Graduate Course Descriptions
Mathematics
MATH   5304     Foundations of Mathematics
This course studies elements of mathematical logic, set theory, number theory and selected topics from discrete mathematics like combinatorial analysis and graph theory. Mathematical proofs are emphasized.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5305     History of Mathematics
This course introduces students to the history of the development of mathematical ideas and techniques from early civilization to the present. The focus will be on both the lives and the works of some of the most important mathematicians. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval.
 
MATH 5307 Practicum in Collegiate Mathematics Teaching
This course provides opportunities for students to have a practical experience in teaching college level mathematics courses supervised by faculty. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval.
 
MATH   5309     Integrating Technology to Mathematics
This is an introductory course related to the latest technological computer programs, especially in mathematics.  It covers some of the following educational computer softwares: graphing calculator, dynamic geometry, computer algebra systems, publishing softwares and some multimedia and internet related softwares.  Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5321     Abstract Algebra
This course covers the principles and concepts of abstract algebra. Topics include: groups and their structure, rings, fields and their extensions, and representation of groups.
 
MATH   5323     Group Theory
This course is an introduction to group theory, one of the central areas in modern algebra.  Topics will include the theorems of Jordan-Hoelder, Sylow, and Schur-Zassenhaus, the treatment of the generalized Fitting subgroup, a first approach to solvable as well as simple groups (including the theorems of Ph. Hall and Burnside).  Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5327     Lie Algebras
This course is an introduction to the theory of Lie Algebras.  Topics include root systems, the Weyl group, nilpotent and solvable Lie Algebras, the theorems of Lie and Engel, Cartan subalgebras, Cartans criterion for semi-simplicity, Chevalley groups and groups of Lie type.         Lec 3,Cr 3
 
MATH   5329     Number Theory
This course is an introduction to number theory, one of the major branches of modern mathematics.  Topics include arithmetic functions (Moebius, Euler, Dirichlet), Dirichlet series (convergence, uniqueness, multiplicative property) distribution of primes (Dirichlet, Tchebycheff, Hadamard resp. de la Vallee Poussin), Riemann’s zeta function.     Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval. Lec 3,Cr 3
 
MATH   5331     Contemporary Geometry
This course contains selected topics in computational, combinatorial, and differential geometry as well as combinatorial topology. Topics include: the point location problem, triangulations, Voronoi diagrams and Delaunay triangulations, plane curves and curvature, surfaces and ployhedrons, and Euler characteristic.
 
MATH   5339     Topology
This course treats both the general and algebraic aspects of topology.  It covers topological spaces, continuous mappings, connectedness and compactness, the fundamental group covering spaces, the Jordan Curve Theorem and a classification of surfaces.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5341     Measure and Integration
This course is an introduction to the principles, concepts, and applications of modern analysis. Topics include: the Riemann integral, Lebesgue measure and Lebesgue integral, the Radon-Nikodym Theorem, and applications to Probability Theory.
 
MATH   5346     Functional Analysis
This course is an introduction to topological vector spaces.  It presents the theory of Hilbert spaces, Banach space techniques and their applications, and basic facts on operator theory and spectral theory.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5348     Differential Equations
This course covers first order and higher order ordinary differential equations, systems of solutions of linear differential equations, the Laplace transform, and several basic concepts of partial differential equations. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5361     Mathematical Modeling
The contents of this course are widely open. It may include modeling with difference and differential equations, and stochastic processes. The course may be project-oriented. Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5362     Graph Theory
This course provides the student with the basic ideas of Graph Theory as it is used in many branches of Industrial Mathematics.  It contains Ramsey Theory, spanning trees, decision trees, matching theory, graph coloring, traveling salesman problems, networks, min-max theorems, flow, Ford-Fulkerson.  Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5365     Discrete Mathematics
This course is on the borderline between mathematics and computer science.  It contains basic graph theory (flows, min-max, Ford Fulkerson), generating functions, (Convolutions, Dirichlet’s generating function, Riemann’s zeta function), design theory, basic facts on coding theory (Reed-Solomon Codes), combinatorial optimization, elements of asymptotics (O-notation), and complexity of algorithms.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5367     Numerical Analysis
This course deals with solutions of equations, interpolation and approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical aspects of linear algebra, and solutions of ordinary differential equations. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5368     Codes, Cyphers, and Security in Communications
This course addresses two related problems in communication theory.  The first deals with errors that occur in the transmission of information: how they can be detected and how they can be corrected. The second is concerned with security of the transmitted information. Lec 3, Cr 3

MATH   5379     Stochastic Analysis
The main objective of this course is to study discrete stochastic processes and their applications.  Topics include Markov process and Markov chains convergence theorems, stopping times, martingales, and applications in trading and marketing.  Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5381     Mathematical Statistics   
This is a course in inferential statistics.  Topics covered include random sampling, distribution of means and the central limit theorem, estimation problems, tests of hypotheses, linear regression, correlation, and analysis of variance.  Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5391     Special Topics in Mathematics
The contents of this graduate course come from different areas of pure and applied mathematics not available in other courses. This course may be repeated twice for credit as topics vary.     Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH 5392 Special Topics in Mathematics for Teachers
The topic of this course may come from different areas of Mathematics especially suited for teachers and not available in other courses.  May be repeated twice for credit as content changes.  Prerequisite: Departmental Approval.
 
MATH   5395     Research Seminar
This is a course to study the current thought and practice within several subject areas in mathematics.  Topics include identifying valid research activities, review of literature and written or oral communication of a research paper.  This course may be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
MATH   5397   Thesis
Participants will define and research some supervisory problems in their specific areas of interest.  Participants will be directed in their study by a graduate faculty member.  A formal research paper dealing with a specific supervisory problem will be required.  This course may be repeated by the approval of the graduate advisor.  Prerequisite:  Departmental Approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Physics and Astronomy
Dr. Soma Mukherjee Chair
SETB 2.210A
882-6679
soma@phys.utb.edu
 
Graduate Faculty
Matthew Benacquista, Professor
Taeviet Creighton, Assistant Professor
Mario Diaz, Professor
Phillip Dukes, Associate Professor
Natalia Guevara, Associate Professor
Andreas Hanke, Associate Professor
Fredrick Jenet, Associate Professor
Karen Martirosyan, Associate Professor
Soumya Mohanty, Associate Professor
Soma Mukherjee, Associate Professor
Richard Price, Professor
Volker Quetschke, Assistant Professor
Malik Rakhmanov, Assistant Professor
Joseph Romano, Professor
Ahmed Touhami, Assistant Professor
 
Master of Science in Physics (M.S.)
30-Hour Thesis/Non Thesis Option
Two options are available for the degree plan leading to the Master of Science in Physics, and the candidate must declare one of the options at the time of admission. Both options require 30 semester credit hours for successful completion.
 
Admission Requirements
Information related to the application procedure and deadlines is available through the Office of Graduate Studies (utb.edu/graduatestudies). All admission requirements as described in the Graduate Catalog remain in effect. Specific criteria for unconditional admission in the M.S. Physics program are as follows:
o    Online application
o    Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
o    GRE General test scores (www.ets.org)
o    The scores must be sent by ETS directly to the University. The ETS code for the University of Texas at Brownsville is 6588
o    To provide some guidance to prospective applicants, the middle 50 percent of GRE-Quantitative scores for students admitted unconditionally in Fall 20101 ranged from 760 to 800
o    Official transcripts from all previously obtained college-level degrees.
o    Two letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant’s undergraduate or graduate scholastic record. The letters have to be mailed or emailed by the referee as follows:
o    By postal mail to:
                        The Graduate Program Coordinator,
                        Department of Physics and Astronomy,
                        The University of Texas at Brownsville
                        80 Fort Brown,
                        Brownsville, TX 78520
                        U.S.A.
                        (The envelopes should be sealed and the seal should have the writer’s signature across it)
o    By email to: gpcoordinator@phys.utb.edu with subject line of the email containing the name of the student
o    Statement of Purpose. Include a letter outlining your motivation why you want to pursue a Masters in Physics. The statement can be provided during the online application process.
The following additional requirements apply for international students:
o    TOEFL scores (www.ets.org/toefl) or IELTS scores (www.ielts.org).
The scores must be sent by the testing agency directly to the University. For TOEFL scores, the ETS code for the University of Texas at Brownsville is 6588.
o    Foreign transcripts may be required to be translated and evaluated by a U.S. based agency when necessary at additional cost to the student. (Information on these services is available at the Office of Graduate Studies).
 
Financial Aid through Research and Teaching Assistantship is available for qualified students.
 
Applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 3.0 but at least 2.5 and/or GRE scores lower than those specified will be considered for admission on a conditional basis.
 
Contact address for the Department of Physics and Astronomy at UTB:
 
Graduate Program Coordinator
Department of Physics and Astronomy
The University of Texas at Brownsville
80 Fort Brown
Brownsville, TX 78520
 
Admissions for Physics and Astronomy Five Year Integrated Masters
The department of Physics & Astronomy enables highly motivated students with strong intellectual capacity to earn a Bachelor’s Degree (Bachelor in Multidisciplinary Studies (BMS) with concentration in Physics and Math) and a Master in Physics within five years.  The integrated program is designed to prepare students for competitive doctoral programs and provide strong leadership skills and professional depth to students entering teaching positions.  Almost all of the freshman Physics students get involved in research under a mentor right from the beginning, facilitating an integrated five year path towards a Master Degree.
o Minimum credits required for graduation - 138 semester credit hours (SCH) (120 (BMS) + 30 (MS) - 12 common = 138).
o Students are eligible to apply for admission into the five-year program during the semester they complete 63 SCH (48 general education core +15 Physics) of undergraduate coursework with at least 3.0 GPA and minimum 3.25 GPS in Physics courses.
o To be considered for admission to the five-year program, the students must submit an application for graduate study during the semester they complete 93 SCH.  Only five-year program candidates demonstrating superior undergraduate academic performance in Physics (GPA>3.0) and strong recommendation will be admitted to the program.
o If admitted to the program, the student must complete at least 12 SCH of MS courses during the fourth year of the undergraduate study.  Candidates should work with their advisors to determine which courses they should be taking up for the graduate study.
o Before the start of the second semester of the third year, they should submit GRE scores.  The GRE scores will be judged at the same standard as any other incoming MS applicant.
o At the end of the fourth year, assuming all conditions are satisfactorily met, the students earn their Baccalaureate Degree.
o During the fifth year, the students complete remaining hours towards an MS Physics degree.
Thesis Option
The Master of Science program thesis option requires the successful completion of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of Physics courses.
 
Required courses (6 sch ):
PHYS 6398        Thesis   (repeated for a total of 6 sch)
Students must enroll in the Master’s Thesis course when recommended to do so by their advisor. They must take this course until final approval has been granted by the advisor.  However, no more than 6 hrs of this course will count toward the M.S. degree.  All candidates must comply with Office of Graduate Studies guidelines regarding thesis application, submission and defense.

Elective courses (24 sch)
Twenty four semester credit hours of Physics courses are required to complete the 30 credit hours. These courses will form part of the student’s Program of Study, with courses chosen to be appropriate for the background and research interests of each student.  In the typical case, a student will take PHYS 5310, PHYS 5320, PHYS 5330 and PHYS 5340 as these are the traditional core courses for more advanced study (e.g., Ph.D. degree) and research.  Additional credit hours may be taken from any of the elective physics courses or graduate courses offered by other departments previously approved by the Department of Physics and Astronomy Graduate Committee. 
 
Non-Thesis Option
This option requires the successful completion of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of Physics courses.
 
Comprehensive Exam: Non-thesis students must take a comprehensive written or oral examination covering the student’s understanding of graduate level Physics concepts. The comprehensive exam will be administered by a departmental committee and the student shall choose between a written or
oral examination in consultation with this committee. The semester in which the comprehensive exam is to be taken will appear on the program of study of non-thesis students. It will not be scheduled prior to the student’s final semester of coursework.
 
In the typical case, a student will take PHYS 5310, PHYS 5320, PHYS 5330 and PHYS 5340 as these are the traditional core courses for more advanced study (e.g., Ph.D. degree) and research. Additional credit hours may be taken from any of the elective physics courses or graduate courses offered by other departments previously approved by the Department of Physics and Astronomy Graduate Committee.
 
Every student admitted into the program will be required to set up a degree plan in consultation with the graduate committee and approved by the department chair. The degree plan will take into account the educational background of the student and his/her future plans. It will consist of a timeline showing the sequence of courses that the student needs to take in order to complete the program successfully. Progress of the student through the program will be measured against this baseline degree plan after the end of each semester. Any changes needed to the degree plan, agreed upon by the student and the graduate committee and approved by the department chair, will also come into effect at the end of each semester.

Ph.D. in Physics Cooperative  Between UTSA and UTB
Students enrolled in The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) Ph.D. Physics program now have the option to reside at UTB and conduct their research under the direction of a graduate faculty member of the UTB Physics and Astronomy Department. All requirements for the program including graduation requirements are the same as those established for the UTSA Ph.D. in physics program.
 
Admission Requirements
See the UTSA graduate catalog (www.graduateschool.utsa.edu) and the department specific requirements. Qualified students conducting their research at UTB will normally be supported financially through research assistantships. Contact the chair of the UTB Physics and Astronomy Department graduate curriculum committee for further information on financial aid.
 
Program Requirements
The doctoral degree requires a minimum of 81 semester credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. The coursework in the program includes a core curriculum (12 semester credit hours) and advanced electives (27 semester credit hours) including graduate courses offered by other departments with the approval of the student’s graduate advisor. Research hours, including Research Seminar (3 semester credit hours), Directed and Doctoral Research (27 semester credit hours) and Dissertation (12 semester credit hours), totaling at least 42 semester credit hours, complete the program.
 
Transfer of credits
Students who complete the M.S. in physics degree program at UTB can transfer up to a maximum of 30 credits from the following courses into the Ph.D. program. Non-degree students who take these courses may also petition UTSA for transfer of credits. (The list of courses for which credits can be transferred is provided later in this document).
 
Courses
A. Core Curriculum (12 semester credit hours):
PHYS    5103     Classical Mechanics I
PHYS    5203     Electrodynamics I
PHYS    5303     Statistical Mechanics
PHYS    5403     Quantum Mechanics I
 
B. Advanced Physics Electives (27 semester credit hours selected from the following or from graduate courses offered by other departments, e.g., Mathematics, Electrical Engineering, Chemistry, etc.):
PHYS    6103     Classical Mechanics II
PHYS    6113     Fluid Mechanics
PHYS    6123     Plasma Physics and Magneto hydrodynamics (MHD)
PHYS    6203    Electrodynamics II
PHYS    6303     Quantum Mechanics II
PHYS    6313     Solid State Physics
PHYS    6323     Nonlinear Optics and Lasers
PHYS    6403     Fundamentals of Space Physics
PHYS    6413     Fundamentals of Astronomy
PHYS    6503     Mathematical Physics I
PHYS    6513     Mathematical Physics II
PHYS    6523     Computational Physics
PHYS    6613     Methods of Experimental Physics
PHYS    6623     Space Physics Laboratory
 
Topics courses may be repeated for credit as the topics vary. The student should consult her/his graduate advisor if in doubt.
PHYS    7403    Topics in Biophysics and Biomedical Physics
PHYS    7503    Topics in Experimental Physics
PHYS    7603     Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
PHYS    7703     Topics in Space Physics
PHYS    7803     Topics in Theoretical Physics
PHYS    7903     Topics in Astrophysics
PHYS    7973     Special Topics in Physics
 
C. Doctoral Research (42 semester credit hours):
PHYS 7001-3     Directed Research (6 hours; prior to passing qualifying exam)
PHYS    7013     Research Seminar (3 hours)
PHYS    7101-3 Doctoral Research (21 hours; after successfully passing qualifying exam)
PHYS    7111-3 Doctoral Dissertation (12 hours)
 
Students must enroll in PHYS 7111-3 Doctoral Dissertation each semester that they receive advice and/or assistance on their dissertation. However, no more than 12 semester credit hours will count toward the Ph.D. degree. Students must attend the Research Seminar for a minimum of three full semesters during their graduate studies. However, no more than three semester credit hours may be applied to the Ph.D. degree.
 
Candidacy
All students seeking a doctoral degree at UTSA must be admitted to candidacy. One of the requirements for admission to candidacy is passing the “Doctoral Qualifying Examination.” Students should consult UTSA’s “Doctoral Degree Regulations” for the other requirements.
 
Qualifying Examination
The qualifying examination is divided into written and oral portions. The written portion will cover the four core courses. The oral portion covers the student’s proposed research program and related fundamentals, must be taken within one year after passing the written portion of
the qualifying examination, and will be evaluated by the student’s dissertation committee. Additional details are described in the UTSA Physics Department’s Graduate Student Handbook.

Defense
The final oral defense consists of a public presentation of the dissertation and a closed oral defense. It is administered and evaluated by the student’s dissertation committee and covers the dissertation and the general field of the dissertation. The dissertation committee must approve the dissertation.
Courses for which credits can be transferred:
The list below states the courses in the UTB M.S. in physics program for which credits can be transferred into the UTSA Ph.D. program. A maximum of 30 credit hours constituted by these courses are transferrable:
 
Core Curriculum (12 SCHs):
PHYS    5310    Classical Mechanics I (UTSA PHY 5103)
PHYS    5320     Electrodynamics I (UTSA PHY 5203)
PHYS    5330     Statistical Mechanics (UTSA PHY 5303)
PHYS    5340     Quantum Mechanics I (UTSA PHY 5403)
UTB Advanced Physics Electives (18 semester credit hours selected from the following):
PHYS    6330     Quantum Mechanics II (UTSA PHY 6303)
PHYS    6320     Electrodynamics II (UTSA PHY 6203)
PHYS    6331     Solid State Physics (UTSA PHY 6313)
PHYS    6350     Mathematical Physics I (UTSA PHY 6503)
PHYS    6351     Mathematical Physics II (UTSA PHY 6513)
PHYS    6352    Computational Physics (UTSA PHY 6523)
PHYS    6371     Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Biological Systems
PHYS    6373     Statistical Physics of Molecular Cell Biology
PHYS    5375     Structure and Function of Biological Molecules
PHYS    6381     Introduction to Astrophysics
PHYS    5387     Special Topics in Physics
PHYS    5392     Gravitational Wave Astronomy
PHYS    5393     Introduction to General Relativity and Gravitation
PHYS    5394     Advanced Statistical Methods for Modern Astronomy
Students conducting research at UTB can take some of the advanced Physics Elective courses or the Topics courses in the UTB Ph.D. program via distance education. The same applies for the Research Seminar course. UTB and UTSA have a direct video link to facilitate this.
 
Graduate Course Descriptions
Physics
Students wishing to enroll in the UTB/UTSA Cooperative PhD (Physics) Program may be required to take: PHYS 5310, PHYS 5320, PHYS 5330 and PHYS 5340 as these are required courses in the UTSA PhD degree program.
 
PHYS    5194     Advanced Statistical Methods for Modern Astronomy Laboratory
This graduate laboratory carries out the implementation in a Matlab environment of the data analysis topics that are being covered in the course. The laboratory has a well-designed curriculum to equip graduate students with the right skills for their subsequent research in astronomical data analysis. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    5310     Classical Mechanics I
This graduate course will introduce students to Newtonian mechanics, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, dynamics of rigid bodies, central force problem and orbital dynamics, symmetries and conservation laws, relativistic dynamics. Lec 3, Cr 3

PHYS    5320     Electrodynamics I
This graduate course will cover electrostatics and magnetostatics, boundary value problems, Maxwell’s equations, plane waves, wave guides diffraction, multiple radiation. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    5330     Statistical Mechanics
This graduate course will introduce students to thermodynamics, equilibrium statistical mechanics, Boltzmann equation and the collision operator, moments of the Boltzmann equations, the Navier-Stokes equations, introduction to non-equilibrium concepts, ensembles, classical and quantum gases, statistical physics of solids. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    5340     Quantum Mechanics I
This graduate course will cover linear vector spaces and linear operators, postulates, Hilbert space formulation, the Schrödinger equation and one-dimensional problems, the hydrogen atom, symmetries, rotational invariance and angular momentum, spin, system with N-degrees of freedom. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS 5360 Optics
This course is an introduction to the field of optics and its modern applications. The course will start with Huygens principle, the wave equation, and the superposition principle. Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, coherence theory, interferometry, and Gaussian optics are among the topics that will also be covered. Co-requisite: PHYS 5320 or consent of instructor.

PHYS    5361     Applied Electromagnetics
This is an advanced graduate course in electromagnetic field theory and electrodynamics, with particular emphasis on EM wave interaction with materials, scattering and guided waves.  The course will cover in great details the physics underlying electromagnetic wave propagation and the engineering of devices such as antennas, arrays, and periodic passive structures that take advantage of these concepts.  Prerequisite: PHYS 5320 and PHYS 5360

PHYS     5375    Structure and Function of Biological Molecules
This course will provide in-depth assessment of structure of biological molecules, with emphasis on structure-function relationship.  Physical principles underlying formation of secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, structural dynamics of DNA and DNA-protein interactions will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.  Mastery of differential equations and mathematical methods at an undergraduate level is expected.  Lec 3, Cr 3

PHYS     5387     Special Topics in Physics
This graduate course will introduce students to different topics.  The topics will be announced.  May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.   Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    5392   Gravitational Wave Astronomy
This course provides a basic and broad description of astrophysics related to sources of gravitational radiation, gravitational wave detectors, numerical relativity, and data analysis. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    5393   Introduction to General Relativity and Gravitation
This graduate course introduces Einstein’s theory of relativity and other topics in the field of gravitation. Topics covered are the Principle of Equivalence, Introduction to Differential geometry and tensor analysis. Also studied are physics on curved manifolds, Einstein’s equations of General Relativity, exact solutions of Einstein’s equations, the Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions, Black Hole Physics and Cosmology, Gravitational radiation and its detection. Prerequisites: PHYS 3310, PHYS 3390, PHYS 3400, PHYS 4330 Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    5394   Advanced Statistical Methods for Modern Astronomy
This course will introduce the student to: gravitational wave astronomy and the detectors, advanced statistical methods, computational methods, introduction to grid computing and the LSC grid. The course has a mandatory laboratory component which will train the students in advanced statistical data analysis and grid computing. Prerequisites: MATH 3447 and Calculus III and PHYS 3490 Mathematics for scientists and engineers I, or consent of instructor

PHYS    6320   Electrodynamics II
This course will introduce the student to relativistic formulation of Maxwell equations, radiation from moving charges, collisions of charged particles, radiation damping, introduction to plasmas, and magneto hydrodynamics.  Prerequisite: PHYS 5320. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    6330   Quantum Mechanics II
This course will introduce the student to variational and WKB methods, time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, path integration formulation, introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics and the Dirac equation. Prerequisite: PHYS 5340. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    6331   Solid State Physics
This graduate course will introduce the student to lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids, band theory of solids, transport properties of metals and semiconductors, optical properties, magnetic properties, magnetic properties, magnetic relaxation, superconductivity, elementary excitations, interactions phonon-phonon, electron-electron, electron-phonon, theory of metals and semiconductors, transport theory, and optical properties. Prerequisite: PHYS 5340. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    6350   Mathematical Physics I
This graduate course will include linear algebra, ordinary and partial differential equations, special functions, eigenvalue problems, complex analysis, group theory.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    6351   Mathematical Physics II
This course will introduce the student to advanced topics in mathematical physics, topology, functional analysis, differentiable manifolds, Lie groups and algebras, and cohomology theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 6350. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    6352   Computational Physics
The course will cover introduction to numerical techniques for solving physics problems, theory of computation and applications to various branches of physics, sample problems might include chaotic motion and nonlinear dynamics, particle trajectories, Monte Carlo simulations, dynamical and statistical descriptions of many body problems, hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic differential equations.
 
PHYS 6362 Quantum Optics
This course introduces the student to non-linear optics and the new field of observing quantum effects in small groups of atoms, starting from a few and down to one. Topics include field quantization, emission and absorption of radiation by atoms, nonlinear optics and parametric conversion, non-classical light, optical tests of quantum mechanics, and experiments with trapped atoms. Prerequisites: PHYS 5360 and PHYS 5340 or consent of instructor.
 
PHYS    6363   Electromagnetic  Metamaterials
This course covers the electromagnetic characterization of metamaterials that is engineered materials with characteristics which may not be found in nature, with particular emphasis on technological applications.  The course provides a deep insight into the fundamental physics needed to fully grasp the technology of antennas, arrays, and frequency selective surfaces using non-conventional materials.  Prerequisite: PHYS 5361 or consent of instructor.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS    6364   Nanophotonics: materials and devices
This course will cover general concepts of nanophotonics which is a new field of physics focused on studies of interaction of light with matter on the nanometer scale.  Topics covered will include near-field optics, photonic crystals, negative index materials, nanocavities, integrated photonic circuits, and their fabrication techniques.  Prerequisites: PHYS 5320 and PHYS 5360 or consent of instructor.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS     6371     Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Biological Systems
This course provides students with fundamentals of statistical thermodynamics, electrostatics and electrochemistry, enzyme kinetics and molecular driving forces.  Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
 
PHYS     6373     Statistical Physics of Molecular Cell Biology
This course introduces students to the basic physical laws governing the life of cells and its material and explains the latest research regarding physical aspects of molecular cell biology, and discusses physical methods used in today’s laboratories.  Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
 
PHYS    6381   Introduction to Astrophysics
This graduate course will introduce students to a range of basic topics in astrophysics: stars, stellar evolution, neutron stars, black holes, galactic dynamics, galaxies, large scale structure in the Universe and cosmology. Prerequisites: PHYS 5320 and PHYS 5310.
 
PHYS    6386   Research Problems in Physics
This course is ideally suited for short-term research projects with well-defined goals. For example, writing a journal paper for publication could be undertaken under this course. This course can be taken by students in both the thesis and non-thesis option. A written report and a seminar are required to pass this course. This course shall not be counted as Thesis research. Consent of instructor required.
 
PHYS     6396     Graduate Research in Physics
This graduate course is a research in physics course in preparation for thesis work (Research I).
Prerequisite:  graduate advisor approval.  Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PHYS     6398   Thesis I
This graduate course initiates students in their thesis work.  Prerequisite: graduate advisor approval.
 
Additional Courses in Science, Mathematics and Technology
Chemistry
CHEM    5303   Advanced Biochemistry
This course is a study of contemporary biochemical topics which include: protein structure and function, enzyme mechanism and kinetics, membrane molecular architecture, nucleic acid biochemistry, gene structure and expression, control of gene expression, cell signaling and motility, molecular immunology and tools of biochemistry. It is recommended that the student complete CHEM 3304 prior to enrolling in this course.  Prerequisite: CHEM 3301, 3314 or instructor’s permission.
 
CHEM    5306   Environmental Chemistry
This course covers environmental issues and the chemistry associated with these issues. Key areas include energy use and production, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere. Specific topics to be discussed include fossil fuels, nuclear and solar energy, the “Greenhouse effect,” ozone chemistry, air and water pollution, water resources, nitrogen and food production, and agrochemicals. Prerequisite: CHEM 1311, 1312, 2323; BIOL 1306 (or 1308), 1307 (or 1309); PHYS 1301. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Engineering
ELET     5302     Circuits and Systems
A review of linear circuit and network theory, supported by introduction of circuit simulation programs with some emphasis on high frequency circuit operation.  Then transmission line theory and operation will be explored.  The course will culminate with a study of system response to stimulation using high speed system stimulation programs. Prerequisite:  PHYS 1302 or PHYS 1402 or PHYS 2326, MATH 2414 or departmental consent.  Lec 3, Cr 3 
 
ELET     5310     Analog and Digital Communication I
Introductory course based upon the principle to provide a thorough treatment of the principles of communications at the physical layer suitable for graduate studies.  This is accomplished by providing fundamentals in telecommunications including analysis of modulation, transmission media, noise in modulation systems, modulation and demodulation techniques, binary data transmission, modern communications models and standards and information theory and coding. Prerequisite:  ENGT 3303 or departmental consent. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ELET     5312     Electromagnetic Propagation I
Electromagnetic wave propagation in different material, transmission, terrain evaluation, and antenna characteristics will be covered. Prerequisite: PHYS 1302, PHYS 1402 or PHYS 2326. ENGT 3303 or departmental consent.  Lec 3, Cr.3
 
ELET     5361     Electromagnetic Applications
It will introduce the aspect related to high frequency technology.  It will prove useful to technical personnel working in the field of microwaves.  In order to provide a comprehensive course at the technology level, emphasis is given to application rather than theory.  Sufficient theoretical background is included where this appears to be helpful.  The course also covers the principles of operation and constructional features of a wide range of microwave hardware.  This course will provide student with advanced capabilities and skills in engineering problem solving related to microwave technology. Prerequisite:  ELET 5310. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
ELET     5370     Technological Changes in Business
Technological changes in a variety of industries will be covered.  Impact of such technological changes on cost and competitiveness will be reviewed. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Environmental Sciences
ESCI     5170     Environmental Sciences Lab
Specialized lab content for contemporary topics in environmental sciences not available in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in corresponding lecture. Cr 1.
 
ESCI     5370     Environmental Sciences
Specialized lecture content for contemporary topics in environmental sciences not available in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.   Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Geography
GEOG    5320   Cultural Geography for Educators
The study of the interaction between humans and the natural environment. Major emphasis in the course is given to human cultural diversity. Topics discussed include population distribution and demography, agriculture practices and regions, patterns and processes of religions and their spatial distributions, ethnicity and nations, urban geography and the development of cities, and natural resources and their management. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
GEOG    5333   Geography of Latin America
A regional study of the geography of Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America. This course will include an investigation of the physical, cultural and economic factors of various regions and how these affect present day conditions. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.
 
GEOG    5334   Conservation of Natural Resources
A survey of the distribution of world resources, with special emphasis on new and novel solutions to problems of resource scarcity. Topics include food, scenic and recreational resources, and other selected components of the biosphere and lithosphere. Cultural, economic, demographic, and political behaviors of human societies are considered as they affect the world’s physical resources. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
GEOG    5440    Geographic Information Systems
This course covers the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) concepts and software such as ArcView and ArcGIS.  Special attention will be given to data acquisition, processing, data management and the generation of base maps. Lec 3, Lab 3, Cr 4.
 
GEOG    5441    Principles of Remote Sensing
This course will emphasize the application of remote sensing and image analysis in the earth sciences; qualitative and quantitative satellite image and air photo interpretation.  Additional emphasis will be placed on the use of computer processing packages. Lec 3, Lab 2, Cr 4.
 
Geology
GEOL    5170  Topics in Geology Lab
Specialized lab content for contemporary topics in geology not available in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in corresponding lecture. Cr 1.
 
GEOL    5310   Earth Science for Educators I
This is the first part of a graduate level, hands-on Earth Science course designed for education majors enrolled in the EC-8 program. The course will provide the students with basic theoretical background in Earth Science with hands-on workshops to enable the student to understand the Earth Science processes at present on the Earth’s surface. Prerequisite: GEOL 1403 and 1404. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
GEOL    5320   Earth Science for Educators II
This is the second part of a graduate level, hands-on Earth Science course designed for education majors enrolled in the EC-8 program. This course will provide the students with a basic theoretical background in Earth Science with hands-on workshops to enable the student to understand the Earth Science processes at present on the Earth’s surface. Prerequisite: GEOL 5310. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
GEOL    5370  Topics in Geology
Specialized lecture content for contemporary topic  for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
Interdisciplinary Science
ISCI      7300   Thesis
Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor or faculty advisor. Cr 3
 
ISCI      7301   Thesis
Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor or faculty advisor. Cr 3
 
Manufacturing
MFET    5301   Design for Manufacture
This course deals with the factors influencing product design and manufacturability. Topics include component design and analysis, design for manufacturability, design for manual and automated assembly and concurrent engineering. Students learn how to reduce material and part costs, assembly time, and number of parts in a product.  Prerequisite: Bachelor of Engineering Technology or Engineering or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3

Physical Sciences
PSCI     5310   Physical Science for Teachers
This graduate level course is designed for in-service elementary and middle school teachers who will be
in Geology not available in other courses. May be repeated implementing hands-on science learning in their classrooms. Students in the Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction with emphasis in Science Education can use the credit for this course to fulfill the requirements for science content. The course will provide the teachers with necessary theoretical background in classical physics, will develop skills in physical experimentation using FOSS modules and other available lab equipment and will enable the students to apply the basic laws of physics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or departmental approval. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSCI     5320   Physical Science for Teachers II
This is the second semester course of Physical Science for Teachers. This course will provide teachers with necessary theoretical background in classical physics, will develop skills in physical experimentation, and will enable students to apply the basic laws and principles of physics to experimental observations. Lec 3, Cr 3
 
PSCI     5330     Physical Science for High School Teachers I
This course provides high school teachers a deeper understanding of classical physics.  Laws of motion, applications of Newton’s Laws, and work-energy relations are the major parts of this graduate level physical science course.  This course will provide teachers with an abundant theoretical background in physics and current research practice with practical experience in related physics labs. Prerequisite:  Graduate standing with a BS or BA degree in a science discipline or department approval. Lec 3, Cr 3 
 
PSCI     5340     Physical Science for High School Teachers II
This course is the continuation of Physical Science for High School Teachers I.  Thermodynamics, electrostatistics, electricity and magnetism, waves, light and optics, and quantum physics are the major parts of this graduate level physical science course.  This course will provide teachers with an abundant theoretical background in physics and current research practice with practical experience in related labs.  Prerequisite: PSCI 5330 with a grade of B or better.   Lec 3, Cr 3
 
For comments and questions, please contact the Webmaster.